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Brenham · Social Sciences · Government - GOVT


American Government
GOVT-2305

  • Spring 2019
  • Section 012 CRN-24855
  • 3 Credits
  • 01/14/2019 to 05/09/2019
  • Modified 01/15/2019

Welcome to Spring 2019 at Blinn College in Brenham, Texas.  I am Dr. Kenneth McCullough, a Blinn American Government professor since 1983.  I earned my BA at UT in Austin (1969), my MA at Johns Hopkins School of Advanced International Studies in Washington, DC (1970) and

Bologna, Italy Center (1971), and my PhD from TAMU in College Station (1992).  I'm active in the Blinn Faculty Book Club, and my favorite TV shows are Property Brothers on HGTV, Million Dollar Listing LA on BRAVO, and The Bachelor on ABC.  I'm improving my Spanish by watching La Rosa de Guadalupe and other telenovelas on Telemundo most evenings.  My favorite hard news channels are FOX and PBS.

Meeting Times


Our American Government 2305 is a Face-to-Face (F2F) course with lots of active-learning opportunities.  (This is not an online class or a "traditional" lecture class.)  Class will begin at 10:35 a.m. and end at 11:50 a.m.  Our Spring Semester class begins on Tuesday, January 15, 2018 and goes through the Final Exam on Tuesday, May 7 from 10:15 a.m. to 12:30 noon .  The Q DROP DATE is Friday, April 26.  Attendance is taken at the beginning of class.  Any student that enters after attendance has been taken will be recorded as absent.  Speak to me after class if there were extenuating circumstances that I need to consider such as a note from an instructor.  In any event, two tardy arrivals or two early departures will equal an absence.  Students are administratively dropped after two weeks of absences (4) from TTh class.

Contact Information


Email:  [email protected]

Office:  Old Main Building 402--or check my classroom OM322.

Classroom:  Old Main Building 322--or check my office OM402.

Phone:  979-830-4228

Office Hours for Spring 2019 are:

  • Monday 9:00 am - 9:45 am
  • Tuesday 9:00 am - 9:45 am
  • Wednesday 9:00 am - 9:45 am
  • Thursday 9:00 am - 9:45 am
  • Friday 9:00 am - 9:45 am
  • OR BY APPOINTMENT

TALK to me before or after class--some matters can often be settled in a minute or two.  TALK to me to set up an office appointment.  If you speak to me in advance, I will double-check my schedule to see whether there are any conflicting events on my schedule.

Description


Government 2305 is a study of the organization, functions, and administration of the several branches and agencies of the national government, including a study of the federal constitution. The primary factors considered relate to the three branches of government -- judicial, executive, legislative -- major historical documents, the events that shaped the nation, and current events. Emphasis will be placed on the interaction of these subsystems. 48 contact hours. Credit: Three semester hours.

Requisites

Student must be college reading ready according to Texas Success Initiatives Standards (TSI). Please see the Catalog section under Texas Success Initiative.

Core Curriculum Statement


Through the Texas Core Curriculum, students will gain a foundation of knowledge in human cultures and the physical and natural world, develop principles of personal and social responsibility for living in a diverse world, and advance intellectual and practical skills that are essential for all learning. For details relating to this core course, please see:

http://www.blinn.edu/academics/core_curriculum.html

Outcomes


Explain the origin and development of constitutional democracy in the United States.

Demonstrate knowledge of the federal system.

Describe separation of powers and checks and balances in both theory and practice.

Demonstrate knowledge of the legislative, executive, and judicial branches of the federal government.

Evaluate the role of public opinion, interest groups, and political parties in the political system.

Analyze the election process.

Describe the rights and responsibilities of citizens.

Analyze issues and policies in U.S. politics.

Materials


WE THE PEOPLE 2017 PKG

REQUIRED |By GINSBERG

  • EDITION:   11E
  • PUBLISHER:   NORTON
  • ISBN:   9780393622850

 

Each student will need to purchase an individual TRI-FOLD POSTER BOARD or FOAM BOARD for the debate project that begins in March.

Course Requirements


 

***SOLO FOUR MAJOR TESTS AND AN A FINAL EXAM:

Each of the four tests will be worth 100 points, and the final exam will be worth 100 points.

TEST ONE will cover the First Day Handouts, Chapters 1, 2, and 3 plus all class activities.  There will be100 Matching Questions based on the textbook and lectures.

TEST TWO will contain 100 Matching Questions which cover Chapters 4, 5, and 11 plus all classroom activities.

TEST THREE will contain 100 Matching Questions which cover Chapters 12, 13, and 14 plus all classroom activities.

TEST FOUR will contain 100 Matching Questions which cover Chapters 15, 16, and 18 plus all classroom activities.

THE COMPREHENSIVE INDIVIDUAL FINAL EXAM will cover the study guides in the yellow pages at the end of the chapters.  The final exam will have 100 MULTIPLE-CHOICE QUESTIONS.

 

***SOLO OR DUO WASHINGTON, DC DISH TOWEL DESIGN POSTER (Hand-drawn and hand-labeled):  During the first week of class, we will discuss how to do the WASHINGTON, DC Dish Towel Design Poster.   Draw, label, and color your "bucket list" of 15-20 must-see locations, landmarks, venues, and monuments which you would definitely want to see on a visit to the nation's capital city.  Draw, label, and color the District of Columbia as well as the surrounding areas of Northern Virginia and Maryland, including major rivers, airports, etc.  Draw and label clever "fun factoids" and regional symbols (flags, flora, and fauna) to fill up empty spaces on the map. No citations are required for the dish towel, but accuracy will be part of the grade!

 

***SOLO (2 minutes) OR DUO (4 minutes) PRESIDENTS' DAILY BRIEFING (PDB):  a US politics and government current event speech plus a roundtable discussion question.  (Sign up on the calendar in class.)  Students will deliver a SOLO or DUO SPEECH PLUS ROUNDTABLE DISCUSSION QUESTION as assigned in class on the calendar.  Begin your speech by addressing the president:  "Good morning, Mr. President.  Today, I would like to brief you about ...."  A good speaker employs a resonant voice, good pacing, good organization, eye contact, confident bearing, and command of the topic.  At the end of your speech, ask the class a question about your speech topic.  The roundtable discussion should provoke some sharing of ideas.

 

***GROUP POWERPOINT PROJECT (SLO #1) ON THE ORIGIN AND DEVELOPMENT OF CONSTITUTIONAL DEMOCRACY IN THE UNITED STATES:  A team of four or five students will prepare and present a PowerPoint (with 8-10 slides and a Works Cited of at least three sources in MLA8 format) about an aspect of the origin and development of constitutional development **of the US constitutional system.  Each group will turn in ONE PRINTOUT of their PowerPoint presentation for the professor to grade.  We will discuss the topic choices ranging from the Magna Carta to landmark Supreme Court cases.  POTENTIAL GROUP TOPICS include:

  • MAGNA CARTA 
  • VOICES OF THE REVOLUTION (Locke, Paine, Sam Adams, etc.)
  • DECLARATION OF INDEPENDENCE (authors and arguments)
  • ARTICLES OF CONFEDERATION (strengths and weaknesses)
  • US PRESIDENTS under the Articles of Confederation (John Hanson, etc.)
  • P0LITICS OF THE FOUNDING FATHERS (Madison, Jefferson, Washington, etc.)
  • PHILADELPHIA CONSTITUTIONAL CONVENTION (1787 overview)
  • CONFLICTS AND DIVISIONS at the constitutional convention
  • WOMEN behind the signers at the constitutional convention
  • RATIFICATION DEBATE (Federalists v. Anti-federalists)
  • BILL OF RIGHTS (Amendments 1-10)
  • AMENDMENTS 11-27 (Pick out four or five to explain in detail.)               
  • LANDMARK SUPREME COURT CASES                 

 

***GROUP DEBATE PROJECT (SLO #7, PERSONAL RESPONSIBILITY):  Teams of THREE or FIVE people will debate a controversial US POLITICAL POLICY ISSUE.  The team will pick a resolution to debate; one side will argue in support of the resolution (AFFIRMATIVE), and the other side will argue against the resolution (NEGATIVE).  (EXAMPLE:  "The United States should take military actions against North Korea.")  Each debater will prepare a simple, legible, handwritten poster with an outline of his or her four major arguments, either "affirmative" or "negative."  The order of presentation will be A1, N1, A2, N2.  Next, the two sides will engage in a FACEOFF.  The FACEOFF will begin with a question or comment by A1.  The FACEOFF continues with a free-flowing exchange of ideas and questions.  At the end of the debate, the moderator will use a legible, handwritten poster to present a balanced view of two affirmative arguments and two negative arguments.  In the end, the moderator will pick the winning side, and/or the whole class can vote to decide the winning side.

 

***DAILY READING PORTFOLIO FOLDER: The reading portfolio is the final project for the semester; it is due a few days before the final exam.  However, students need to work concurrently on the folder as they read twelve chapters in We the People, 11e. by Benjamin Ginsburg.

Turn in your handwritten portfolio in a folder.  Since we are reading twelve chapters this semester, write six "Q and As" on the front and six "Q and As" on the back of each sheet--12 chapters times 12 "Q and As" equals 144 entries.  Use material in each of the assigned chapters that will likely be on the major tests and final exam.  The twelve chapters that students should address are:  1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, and 18.

 

  

Evaluation


GRADING SYSTEM:

  •  100 points.........................SOLO OR PAIR Washington, DC Dishtowel Poster
  •  100 points.........................SOLO OR PAIR USA 2-4 Minute PDB speech + question
  •  100 points.........................GROUP DEBATE with individual posters (SLO #7)
  •  100 points.........................GROUP POWERPOINT with printout (SLO #1)
  •  400 points.........................SOLO Four major tests
  •  100 points.........................DAILY READING PORTFOLIO FOLDER
  •  100 points.........................Participation in all aspects of the course
  •  200 points.........................INDIVIDUAL FINAL EXAM

         1,200 points TOTAL

* MAKEUP TESTS and homework assignments will be finished and turned in BEFORE you are absent, if your absence is scheduled in advance.  NO MAKEUP TESTS will be given unless you have a excused absence recognized by the institution.  Other absences may be excused at the professor's discretion, but they will receive one-half credit.

LATE ASSIGNMENTS will receive no more than half credit.  If you know you are going to be absent on the date the assignment is due, then turn in the assignment early to me or send it to me on time with a reliable person.  Time Extensions need to be approved at least 24 hours in advance. 

BONUS POINTS (no more than 50 points per activity):  (1)  Avid readers might enjoy reading and reviewing a "mutually agreed-opon" NEW GOVERNMENT BOOK in my office (50 points if you demonstrate some "deep learning").  Turn in a focused paragraph summary of each chapter on the day that you come to my office to demonstrate your deep learning.  (2)  CARS mentors will be rewarded at the rate of 5 points per session, up to 10 sessions. (50 points maximum in this category)

 

POINT SYSTEM FOR ASSIGNING FINAL GRADES:

"A" = 1,080 points or higher

"B" = 960 points to 1,079 points

"C" = 840 points to 959 points

"D" = 720 points to 839 points

"F" = Below 720 points

 

GENERAL RUBRIC for evaluation of in-class writing, discussion, speeches, and other assignments):

  • EXEMPLARY means the student contributes original ideas, critical insight, and deep thinking; he asks about persistent questions or redirects discussion in a positive way. The student uses a fair approach in assessing competing points of view or conflicting data.  He has adopted a "growth mindset" and makes a sincere effort to excel.  He is never distracted by his electronics.  (90% or higher)
  • GOOD means the student contributes more than mere facts; he displays an effort at critical thinking and attempts to address issues in a fair-minded way.  He frequently displays a "growth mindset" and usually makes an effort.  He is rarely distracted by his electronics.  (80% to 89%)
  • SATISFACTORY means the student contributes mostly factual material, but he does not attempt to "stand in another person's shoes" as he assesses conflicting points of views or contradictory evidence. He inconsistently displays a "growth mindset; his efforts are spotty and unpredictable. He is inappropriately distracted by his electronics.  (70% to 79%)
  • MARGINAL means the student demonstrates minimal effort; he goes through the motions, but he usually has a "fixed mindset."  He is easily and inappropriately distracted by his electronics.  (60-69%)
  • UNSATISFACTORY means the student fails to contribute or displays a lack of preparation.  He has a "fixed mindset" and rarely makes an effort to improve.  He is frequently and inappropriately distracted by his electronics.  (0% to 59%)

Blinn College Policies


All policies, guidelines, and procedures in the Blinn College CatalogBlinn College Board Policies, and the Blinn College Administrative Regulations are applicable to this course.

Specific information on civility, attendance, add/drop, scholastic integrity, students with disabilities, final grade appeal, alternative retailers, campus carry and proctoring arrangements and cost.

Notice of any action taken under these protocol and procedures, by Blinn College or its employees, may be delivered by hand, through the U.S. Postal Service, or electronically to the student’s Blinn Buc e-mail account. Notice shall be deemed received upon actual receipt, on deposit in the U.S. Mail, or upon entering the information processing system used by Blinn College for Blinn Buc e-mail accounts, whichever first occurs.

Course Policies


The following expectations are to enhance your ability to learn in the class, to avoid disruption and distraction, and to improve the quality of the experience in this class.

  1. Be on time and stay the entire class.  Interruptions, including but not limited to being late, leaving early or bathroom breaks, are disruptive to the learning process and disrespectful to the instructor and other students.   Arrive a couple of minutes early so that you can pick up handouts and focus on our class. 
  2. Attendance is taken at the beginning of class.  Any student that enters after attendance is taken will be counted absent for the entire class period.  Any student that leaves class early for any reason, at the instructor's discretion, may receive an unexcused early departure for not remaining in class for the entirety of its scheduled time.  Speak to me after class if there were extenuating circumstances that I need to consider (such as an instructor's note).  Two tardy arrivals or late departures equal one absence.  Students are administratively dropped after two weeks of absences from class.
  3. Turn off and store all electronic devices (including but not limited to cell phones, laptops, tablets, iPods, vapes, headphones) out of view during class.  A book bag works best!  Place your book bag, etc. at the back of the classroom.
  4. By the time the professor closes the classroom door, you need to DISENGAGE YOUR ELECTRONICS and put them in a book bag, purse, attaché case, etc.  Place your book bag, purse, brief case, etc. at the back of the classroom, not in a chair, on your back, or on the desk.  Otherwise, place your electronics on the console in front of the classroom.  If I see or hear your electronics during class, you may be asked to leave until we have a CIVILITY CONFERENCE.  If you are reprimaned for electronics use, you may lose 50 participation points.
  5. Only one person talks at a time.  Be professional.  (Do not use profanity.)  It is okay to disagree with an idea; however, practice the art of disagreeing without being disagreeable.
  6. Stay focused!  Sit around people who will allow you to focus on the professor's objectives.  If you carry on private conversations that distract me, I will ask you to leave until we have a CIVILITY CONFERENCE.  You will lose 50 participation points.
  7. Bring your textbook to class.  Markup your reading assignments before class.  Focus on your reading assignments by turning off the distractions around you.
  8. If you have a soft "library" voice, then sit close to me so I can hear you.  If you are easily distracted, then sit in the front of the room close to me.
  9. Take part.  Get involved.  Be engaged.  Sleeping, slumping, and slouching in class are unacceptable.  If you fall asleep, slump over, or slouch (assume an awkward, drooping, or excessively relaxed posture) at your desk, I will ask you to leave until we have a CIVILITY CONFERENCE.  You will lose 50 participation points.
  10. The class has a right to an environment free of unnecessary distractions with students walking "in and out" of class.  If you feel compelled to walk out, then take your books and LEAVE.  Rushing out of the classroom to take care of extraneous personal matters (such as taking a personal call or a bathroom break) is disruptive. You will lose 50 participation points.
  11. If you must leave class early for a scheduled appointment, let me know in advance.  Othewise, you will be marked absent after an early departure.
  12. If you bring food into the classroom, I will ask you to put it away--so eat it in the hall before class.  Bottled drinks are OK with me, but take the empties with you to recycle.
  13. Respect yourself and others.  If your clothes are dirty and smelly after a day of hard work, keep a fresh set of clothes in your vehicle or backpack.
  14. Racial, sexual, ethnic, sexual orientation, disability and other offensive slurs are unacceptable.  I will deduct 50 participation points for each incident of rude or disrespectful behavior.
  15. Turn in your assignments and projects on time.   Late assignments will receive no more than half credit unless the student's absence was excused by Blinn College.  Some absences may be considered excused at the discretion of the faculty member with appropriate documentation.
  16. Do your own work, take your tests honestly, and cite your sources when you "borrow" material.  Cheating, plagiarism, and collusion on individual assignments and tests are indefensible.  If you do homework assignments with other people, be sure to use your own words; never copy another student's work. 

 

Schedule


Course calendar and related activities
When Topic Notes
DAY 1: Tuesday, January 15, 2019 (75 lecture minutes)
GOVT 2305 INTRODUCTIONS with sample USA Current Events Speech ("Mr President") with Roundtable Discussion/ Write your "autobiography" in class.

Learn some names.  Pick up your first-day GOVT 2305 course syllabus and first-day handouts.  Write your autobiography in class.  FANTASY FLIGHT 2305 TO WASHINGTON, DC. will introduce the geography and political culture of Washington, DC and the United States.  Discuss the Washington, DC Dishtowel Design Project.

DAY 2: Thursday, January 17, 2019 (75 lecture minutes, Three contact hours for Week One)
Read Chapter 1 before today's class: American Political Culture. In other words, READ THE CHAPTER for "light bulb" moments.

Be prepared to discuss Chapter 1:  American Political Culture.  If you have any "light bulb" moments ("ah-HA" moments) as you are reading the chapter, be sure to jot them down and share them with the class.  What is the point of reading unless it sets off some "light bulbs" in your brain?  Can you recognize any textbook concepts in your "real" life?

DAY 3: Tuesday, January 22, 2019 (75 lecture minutes)
Present your Washington, DC Dishtowel Design Project at the beginning of class.

Students will present a short explanation of the "bucket list" they selected to illustrate on the Washington, DC Dishtowel Design Project.  Late work receives no more than one half credit.

DAY 4: Thursday, January 24 (75 lecture minutes, Three contact hours for Week Two)
We will discuss Chapter 2: The Founding and the Constitution. In other words, read the chapter for "light bulb" moments before class.

Read Chapter 2 in advance so that you can join in the discussion today.  If you have any "light bulb" moments as you are reading the chapter, jot them down and share them in class.  What is the point of reading unless it sets off some "light bulbs" in your brain?  Can you recognize any textbook concepts in your "real" life?

WE WILL PICK GROUPS FOR THE US CONSTITUTION POWERPOINT GROUPS TODAY.

DAY 5: Tuesday, January 29 (75 lecture minutes)
GO DIRECTLY TO THE BULLOCK LAB 153 ELECTRONIC CLASSROOM to work on the US CONSTITUTION GROUP POWERPOINT.

Dr. McCullough will instruct the class on the US CONSTITUTION GROUP POWERPOINT PROJECT.  Groups will begin working on a PowerPoint Printout with 8-10 slides and an attached bibliography with three sources in MLA8 format.

POTENTIAL GROUP TOPICS are listed under Course Requirements above.

DAY 6: Thursday, January 31 (75 lecture minutes, 3 contact hours for Week Three)
We will discuss Chapter 3: Federalism. In other words, read the chapter before class.

After we finish discussing Chapter 3, we will have an early review game for Test 1.

DAY 7: Tuesday, February 5 (75 lecture minutes)
POWERPOINTS PRESENTATIONS on the origin and development of the US Constitution.

Small groups will do a PowerPoint Presentation (8-10 slides) about a specific aspect of the origins and development of the US Constitution.  Turn in a group printout of the PowerPoint with an attached bibliography containing three sources in MLA8 format.

DAY 8: Thursday, February 7 (75 lecture minutes, 3 contact hours for Week Four)
"MR. PRESIDENT" SPEECHES

Up to eight students will present a SOLO TWO-MINUTE PDB (president's daily briefing) on a current event + ROUNDTABLE DISCUSSION QUESTION.  Start with the words, "Mr. President, I (we) would like to brief you about...."

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DAY 9: Tuesday, February 12 (75 lecture minutes)
TEST ONE

TEST ONE will cover Chapters 1, 2, and 3 as well as all classroom activities (such as the Fantasy Flight 2305 to Washington, D.C.).

DAY 10: Thursday, February 14 (75 lecture minutes, 3 contact hours for Week Five)
We will discuss Chapter 4: Civil Liberties (the Bill of Rights).

Be prepared to discuss Chapter 4:  Civil Liberties.

DAY 11: Tuesday, February 19 (75 lecture minutes)
We will discuss Chapter 5: Civil Rights.

Be prepared to discuss Chapter 5:  Civil Rights.

DAY 12: Thursday, February 21 (75 lecture minutes, 3 contact hours for Week Six)
We will discuss Chapter 11: Groups and Interests.

Be prepared to discuss Chapter 11:  Groups and interests.

WE WILL PICK GROUPS FOR THE DEBATES TODAY.

DAY 13: Tuesday, February 26 (75 lecture minutes)
GO DIRECTLY TO THE BULLOCK LAB 153 ELECTRONIC CLASSROOM to work with the debate groups.

We will work with our small groups in the library's electronic classroom in Bullock Lab 153.

DAY 14: Thursday, February 28 (75 lecture minutes, 3 contact hours for Week Seven)
"MR. PRESIDENT" SPEECHES

Up to eight students will present a SOLO TWO-MINUTE PDB (presidential daily briefing) on a current events topic+ ROUNDTABLE DISCUSSION QUESTION.  Start with the words, "Mr. President, I (we) would like to brief you about ...."

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DAY 15: Tuesday, March 5 (75 lecture minutes)
TEST TWO

Test Two will cover Chapters 4, 5, and 11 + all classroom activities.

DAY 16: Thursday, March 7 (75 lecture minutes, 3 contact hours for Week Eight)
We will discuss Chapter 12: Congress.

Be prepared to discuss Chapter 12:  Congress.

DAY 17: Tuesday, March 19 (75 lecture minutes)
We will discuss Chapter 13: The Presidency.

Be prepared to discuss Chapter 13:  The Presidency.

DAY 18: Thursday, March 21(75 lecture minutes, 3 contact hours for Week Ten)
USA DEBATES

Groups for Chapter 12 and Chapter 13 will debate today.  Each debater prepares a simple, legible, handwritten poster which outlines his or her four main arguments, either "affirmative" or "negative." Next, the FACEOFF will allow for a free flowing exchange of ideas. The moderator will end the debate by presenting a hand-written poster with two affirmative arguments and two negative arguments. Lastly, the moderator (or the class) with select the winning side of the debate.

DAY 19: Tuesday, March 26 (75 lecture minutes)
We will discuss Chapter 14: Bureaucracy.

Be prepared to discuss Chapter 14:  Bureaucracy. 

DAY 20: Thursday, March 28 (75 lecture minutes, 3 contact hours for Week Eleven)
"MR PRESIDENT" SPEECHES

Up to eight students will present a SOLO "TWO-MINUTE PDB (presidential daily briefing) on a US current event + Roundtable Discuss Question.  Start with the words, "Mr. President, I (we) would to brief you about ...."

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DAY 21: Tuesday, April 2 (75 lecture minutes)
TEST THREE

Test Three will cover Chapters 12, 13, and 14 + all classroom activities.

DAY 22: Thursday, April 4 (75 lecture minutes, 3 contact hours for Week Twelve)
We will discuss Chapter 15: The Federal Courts

Be prepared to discuss the federal courts.

DAY 23: Tuesday, April 9 (75 lecture minutes)
USA DEBATES

Groups for Chapter 14 and Chapter 15 will debate today.  Each debater prepares a simple, legible, handwritten poster which outlines his or her four main arguments, either "AFFIRMATIVE" or "NEGATIVE."  The FACEOFF will follow, allowing a free-flowing exchange of ideas.  The moderator will end the debate by presenting a poster will the two best affirmative arguments and the two best negative arguments.

DAY 24: Thursday, April 11, 2019 (75 lecture minutes, 3 contact hours for Week Thirteen)
We will discuss Chapter 16: Government and the Economy.

Be prepared to discuss the national government and the federal economy.

DAY 25: Tuesday, April 16 (75 lecture minutes)
We will discuss Chapter 18: Foreign Policy and Democracy.

Be prepared to discuss US foreign policy. 

DAY 26: Thursday, April 18 (75 lecture minutes, 3 contact hours for Week Fourteen)
USA DEBATES

Groups for Chapter 16 and Chapter 18 will debate today.  Each debater prepares a simple, legible, handwritten poster which outlines his or her three main arguments, either "affirmative" or "negative." The class will observe and critique the debates.

DAY 27: Tuesday, April 23 (75 lecture minutes)
"MR PRESIDENT" SPEECHES

Up to eight speakers will present a SOLO "TWO-MINUTE" PDB (presidential daily briefing) on a US current event + Roundtable Discussion Question.  Start with the words, "Mr. President, I (we) would like to brief you about...." 

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DAY 28: Thursday, April 25 (75 lecture minutes, 3 contact hours for Week Fifteen)
TEST FOUR

Test Four will cover Chapters 15, 16, and 18 + all classroom activities.

DAY 29: Tuesday, April 30 (75 lecture minutes)
TURN IN YOUR PORTFOLIO FOLDER OF REVIEW Q & A FOR THE FINAL EXAM. (Twelve Chapters 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 18)

Turn in your portfolio in a folder.  Since we are reading twelve chapters this semester, write 6 salient Q & A on the front and 6 Q & A on the back of each sheet (12 chapters X 12 Q & A = 144 items total)  Use material in each of the assigned chapters that will likely be on the final.

DAY 30: Thursday, May 2 (75 lecture minutes, 3 contact hours for Week Sixteen)
COMPREHENSIVE INDIVIDUAL FINAL EXAM REVIEW SESSION

The FINAL EXAM will be from 10:15-12:30 noon on Thursday, May 9.  It will cover the study guides (the "yellow pages") at the end of each assigned chapter. 

DAY 31: Tuesday, May 7 from 10:15 -12:30 noon (3 contact hours for Week Seventeen, 48 total contact hours for the Spring Semester)
FINAL EXAM

The final exam will be on Tuesday, May 7 from 10:15 to 12:30 noon.  It will cover the "yellow pages" at the end of each assigned chapter.