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Blinn College • Bryan • Natural Science • Chemistry - CHEM


General Chemistry II CHEM-1412

  • Spring 2013 Full Term 2013

  • Section SECTION_302 CRN-21774

  • 4 Credits

  • 01/14/2013 to 05/07/2013

  • Modified 01/11/2013



Meeting Times


Lecture

Monday, Wednesday, 1:25 PM to 2:40 PM, S113

Lab

Monday, Wednesday, 2:50 PM to 4:05 PM, S228

Contact Information


Instructor: Dr. Beverly A. Clement

Email: bclement@blinn.edu
Office: S237
Phone: 979-209-7590
Website: https://www.blinn.edu/brazos/natscience/chem/bclement/

Office Hours:

Monday, Wednesday, 11:00 AM to 1:00 PM, S237
Tuesday, Thursday, 10:00 AM to 2:30 PM, S237

Description


CHEM 1412 consists of the study of the fundamental laws, theories and concepts of chemistry including oxidation-reduction reactions, electrochemistry, thermodynamics, chemical equilibria, nuclear and organic chemistry.

Requisites

Prerequisites: MATH 1314 or its equivalent, CHEM 1410 or CHEM 1411 with a grade of "C" or better.

Core Curriculum Statement


This is a Core Course in the 42-Hour Core Curriculum of Blinn College. As such, students will develop proficiency in the appropriate Intellectual Competencies, Exemplary Educational Objectives, and Perspectives.

Outcomes


1. State the characteristics of liquids and solids, including phase diagrams and spectrometry.

2. Articulate the importance of intermolecular interactions and predict trends in physical properties.

3. Identify the characteristics of acids, bases, and salts, and solve problems based on their quantitative relationships.

4. Identify and balance oxidation-reduction equations, and solve redox titration problems.

5. Determine the rate of a reaction and its dependence on concentration, time, and temperature.

6. Apply the principles of equilibrium to aqueous systems using LeChatelier’s Principle to predict the effects of concentration, pressure, and temperature changes on equilibrium mixtures.

7. Analyze and perform calculations with the thermodynamic functions, enthalpy, entropy, and free energy.

8. Discuss the construction and operation of galvanic and electrolytic electrochemical cells, and determine standard and non-standard cell potentials.

9. Define nuclear decay processes.

10. Describe basic principles of organic chemistry and descriptive inorganic chemistry.

Materials


Bryan

Textbook:  General Chemistry, John E. McMurry, Robert C. Fay, 6th Edition, Pearson Prentice Hall, 2012. Strongly recommended, not required.

Lab Manual: General Chemistry 1412 Laboratory Manual, 3rd Edition, Beverly A. Clement, Blinn College, Bluedoor, LLC, 2012.

Online Homework: Mastering Chemistry; Pearson – Prentice Hall; www.masteringchemistry.com

Calculator: simple scientific calculator (standard, without graph and memory features)

Safety Equipment: safety eyewear (OSHA approved, chemical goggles or safety glasses with side shields - REQUIRED), aprons (Optional)

General Chemistry – The Official Guide, American Chemical Society, Division of Chemical Education (Optional)

For days that you perform an experiment, you will need to be covered from your neck to your knees, shirts must have sleeves. You will also need to wear enclosed footwear (closed toed shoes). You will be dismissed from the laboratory if you fail to follow safety procedures, wear protective eye wear at all times, or wear sandals or other open toed footwear to lab. Missing a lab will result in a zero for the experiment (data sheet and report) being performed that day. There are no make-up labs.

Course Requirements


Lecture

You are responsible for all material contained in the textbook.  You are expected to be reading ahead in the textbook and on average cover one (1) chapter per week.  During the lecture I will cover the more difficult concepts and provide examples but feel no obligation to cover all material contained within the textbook. Questions are welcomed at any time during the lecture.  During the semester you will be given five (5) exams during the class and laboratory period.  These exams are cumulative although the most recently covered material will be most heavily emphasized on the exam.  There is also a cumulative Final Exam at the end of the semester. There is a homework assignment associated with each chapter covered. The completed homework sets are due before the exam covering those chapters. The homework assignments will be completed on Mastering Chemistry and your grade will be posted on eCampus. The exam dates listed on the schedule are tentative. Any changes in an exam date will be announced at least one (1) week prior to the exam and this information will be posted on eCampus. The final exam is cumulative, should you miss the final a grade of zero (0) will be awarded.  I will supply the Scantrons used for the multiple choice portion of the lecture exams and for the Final Exam. We will cover chapter 2 (sections 2.7-2.9), chapters 11-17, 20, 22 and 23 this semester. There is a common Final Exam so skipping material is not an option.

Exams

This semester the exams will be broken into two parts, Part A and Part B. Each exam (Parts A and B combined) is worth 100 points.  The five (5) exams are worth a total of 500 points.

Part A will be given first during the lecture portion of the exam.  This portion of the exam  will be in a “fill in the page” format.  It will consist of up to 20 free response questions and will be worth 80 points.  A periodic table will be provided for these exams.  No formula sheets are allowed during Part A.  You are expected to know the relevant formulas from memory.  This means that you should be able to set up the formulas for all questions requiring calculations from memory. Practicing this will improve your exam performance. In general, the questions will either require you to recall information from the course, or will require you to calculate an answer. You will have 75 minutes in which to complete the in class exams. Part A exams are worth a total of 400 points or 40% of your final grade.

When you arrive in the classroom on days in which an exam is being administered please place your books, backpacks, etc. against the wall at either the front or back of the room.  Make certain you have all cell phones turned off or to silent mode.  Time spend having students move their stuff to the back of the room will cost time that could be spent on the exam.  Whether you are finished or not, when time expires, Part A is finished.

The second portion of these exams, Part B, will be taken in the laboratory.  Part B will consist of 20 multiple choice questions. For Part B of the exam you will be allowed to use your book and notes if you have them.  Part B exams are worth 20 pts each for a total of 100 points of 10% of your final grade. 

FINAL EXAM

CHEM 1412 has a common final. The Final Exam will be given on Saturday, May 4 at 1:00 p.m. The Final Exam is comprehensive and is worth 200 points or 20% of your final grade. Typically the final exam will have between 40 and 80 questions (typically between 30 and 40% of these questions will involve calculations). A periodic table is provided along with scratch paper.  No formula sheet is given.  The final exam is not mandatory, if you miss the Final, you will be awarded a grade of zero for that exam. The final grade is based upon your percentage of the 1000 total points for the course. There is no make-up for the final exam. Showing up late, car trouble, forgetting, etc. are not excuses for missing the exam (a zero will be awarded).

Homework

There are Mastering Chemistry chapter assignments for each of the 11 chapters that will be covered. Mastering Chemistry is an interactive system, to receive full credit you will have to "demonstrate mastery" of a particular question set. There is no limit to your attempts. The questions are based upon those at the end of each chapter. The majority of the questions chosen for these assignments are algorithmic. This means that the values and compounds change for the question. You do not get the same question again for a great many submissions and, even then, the actual values used may be changed. (While answering additional questions in that section may be good practice, you will not get credit for repeating the section or answering additional questions in a mastered section.) Plan to spend a significant amount of time on Mastering Chemistry (1 to 2 hours per night). Mastering Chemistry keeps track of your progress so you can work on the homework throughout the time (weeks) the assignment is active. Again, you cannot wait until the last minute to complete your Mastering Chemistry homework; you will run out of time. Mastering Chemistry records each visit you make to the program, so I will be able to monitor your usage of the system. Your points accumulated on your Mastering Chemistry assignment will be posted and kept updated on eCampus. You may choose to work on your homework as often as you wish/need (you will not have to re-answer previously completed sections). The homework must be submitted by the deadline listed above in order to receive credit. Your score for the homework component of your grade will be the average of each of the chapter assignments. Skipping a chapter will result in a grade of zero for that chapter. Failure to do the required homework will cost you 5% of your grade in the course.

All of the computer labs at Blinn are available and should run Mastering Chemistry well. If you encounter any problem with any of the Computer Lab computers, let me know immediately so the lack of compatibility can be corrected. Waiting until the last few days of the assignment to begin working on your homework and finding you have computer problems is not an excuse and no additional time will be granted for these situations.

Homework will be graded on the following criteria: completion by deadline; the completion of the assignment, and the percentage of answers that are correct.

The homework is worth 50 points or 5% of your grade in this course. If you fail to submit your homework, you will receive a grade of zero for that section. I need to know as soon as possible if you are having difficulty accessing Mastering Chemistry. Each chapter is worth 5 points. You will receive a score for each Chapter Assignment. Your homework grade will be the total of these eleven (11) assignments (a possible 5 point bonus if you get full credit on all 11 chapters). Your score on each section will be posted on eCampus. This way you can assess your current “grade” in the course throughout the semester.

I am available during office hours to assist you. I am happy to help you with any of Mastering Chemistry that you are having problems with. This does not mean that I will do all of your Mastering Chemistry homework for you. If you are having a problem with a few questions, I can assist, but I will not work all of the problems with you.

Once again, each Mastering Chemistry section is open for several weeks. Waiting until the week (or days) before an exam and suddenly having computer or network problems is not an acceptable excuse for not being able to complete your homework assignment. The Mastering Chemistry assignments follow the chapters in your text book. In the past there has been a very high correlation between exam grades and the completion of assigned homework. Therefore, the deadline for completing each group of chapters will be 8:00 pm the night prior to that particular exam. The table below is the list of current deadlines. Should an exam be moved, the deadlines would be adjusted accordingly. The Mastering Chemistry "clock" is the official time used. Once the deadline has passed, you will receive no credit for additional homework completed.

Laboratory

Because of space, time, and equipment considerations, you may work with one partner for the laboratory.  You must be properly attired (closed-toe shoes, sleeves, coverage from neck to below knees) and have appropriate eye protection to be allowed to perform an experiment.  You will be dismissed from the laboratory for violating the safety rules (wearing inappropriate clothing, no safety goggles/glasses (or lack of proper use), wearing sandals or flip-flops, etc.).  Any visible food or drink container (even if it is sealed) is a safety violation in lab and will cause your immediate removal from the laboratory with a grade of zero being assigned for that experiment.

Dismissal from the laboratory will not count as an “official” absence but it will result is loss of all points associated with that experiment.

You will be performing 12 experiments this semester.  If you miss a lab for any reason (illness, or dismissal for no eye protection or no shoes, etc.), a grade of zero will be awarded for the Laboratory Grade. Absence from the laboratory on the day of the experiment for any reason (excused or unexcused) will result in you receiving a zero for all parts of that experiment.  Only the top 10 experiment totals will be “used”. This will allow you to “miss” one experiment without penalty.   Failure to turn in a data sheet on the day an experiment is performed will be treated and reported as an absence and will result in a zero for that experiment.

The additional lab experiments will be used as “bonus points”.  If you attend all the labs, turn in the data sheet as required, successfully complete the pre-lab questions, the lab report itself, and the post lab questions, you could earn an additional 50  bonus points.  There are NO make-up labs but there is a potential extra credit opportunity should you attend and successfully complete all labs and reports.

The laboratory component will make up 25% of your final grade. It is based upon your active participation in the laboratory activity. You should be prepared to run a laboratory experiment every day we meet in S226. You must have your lab manual, appropriate clothing, foot wear and chemical resistant safety goggles for each lab session. Be aware that some days, I may choose to continue the lecture or to spend the laboratory time covering a problem set. Regardless, you must attend each lab prepared to do a lab.  A few of the experiments may be "dry labs" in which concepts and not experimental procedures are emphasized and the safety requirements are ‘relaxed’ for that session. Laboratory experiments and the reports for the experiments will be graded and will count towards a maximum of 250 pts or 25% of your final grade.

The laboratory schedule is outline below. The Pre-Lab Questions are due at the beginning of the laboratory period the date the experiment is listed and are worth a maximum of 5 pts. Any pre-lab questions turned in late, meaning after the beginning of the laboratory period, will be worth a maximum of 2 pts. Pre-lab questions turned in after that laboratory's posted report due date will receive a grade of zero (0). You will be graded on your reasoning and responses to the questions. Pre-lab questions typically deal with safety and some of the calculations you need for the experiment. The formulas and theory required to answer these questions are in the Discussion portion that precedes the Experimental Procedure in your lab manual.

Lab Data Sheets will be required for each "wet" lab. To receive credit for this, you must turn in the duplicate page BEFORE you leave lab that day and have the sheet signed and dated by the instructor. Each student must submit their own data sheet. One name will be credited per sheet. No notebook paper will be accepted for these data sheets. Without a data sheet with my initials and date, your lab report will not be graded. This copy of your data must be turned in and initialed by mebefore you leave the laboratory or you will not receive credit for attending that laboratory (this also counts as a class absence). The original (top sheet) of your data is to be used to complete your lab report and must be turned in with your report. If you are absent from lab (regardless of excuse) or forget to turn this in prior to leaving the lab, you will receive a grade of zero (0) for that Lab Data. Each student is required to turn in a copy of the data. The raw data on this form must match the data on your on the original (top page) turned in with your Laboratory Report. The copy of your data is worth 5 points. (A page turned with a name and no data receives a grade of ZERO.)

The Lab Data Sheet will also be used to establish your presence in the laboratory. For those days in which no additional data or data sheet is required, an alternate method will be used to document attendance (quiz or roll sheet).

Laboratory Reports and Post-Lab Questions are worth a total of 15 pts and are due on the date listed for that experiment.  The lab report portion is worth a maximum of 10 pts of this total. If you are absent from an experiment, regardless of reason, you will receive a grade of zero on the report portion of this grade. Again, the data used on your Lab Report must match the data you turned in on your data sheet when you were in lab or a grade of zero (0) will be awarded. Post-lab questions are worth a maximum of 5 pts.

The Laboratory Report requires you to use your data to determine some experimental result. Calculations are invariably required to "work up" your data. Space is provided on the Laboratory Report form for you to show your work. Simply writing down a number or writing an equation with data that doesn't match your results or produces an answer different that that reported will receive a grade of zero (0). The bulk of the points awarded on the Report portion of the lab report come from these “worked out” equations and calculations.  Simply no work shown or answers that could not result from the particular equation you have shown will receive a grade of zero. (Technically you have already been awarded 5 points for collection of the data).

Post-Lab questions frequently require your response to "what would happen if some specific event happened as you were collecting your experimental data" and generally ask how this additional solvent, undissolved material, volume measurement or other experimental data you recorded would alter your calculated results (if at all). Generally this response will require a minimum of two or three sentences to explain your answer. An answer of "high," "low," or "no effect" will receive NO CREDIT unless a brief description of WHY is also given (use accepted sentence structure). Likewise, stating that your results would be "inaccurate" will also receive a grade of zero, Your reasoning as to how this particular event/data would alter the results causing your calculated results to be too high (or low, or why it would be unaffected). Lab reports and post-lab questions that are turned in up to 1 week late will automatically lose 50% of the possible points. Lab reports more than two weeks late will receive a zero. [Illness, legal difficulties, etc. will be considered on an individual basis to extend this deadline for laboratory reports.] The experiments are worth a total of 25 points each (PreLab 5 pts; data sheet 5 pts; Report 10 pts; and PostLab questions 5 pts).

Your grades will be posted immediately after the material is graded. Your graded Pre-Lab Questions, Lab Data Sheets, Lab Reports, and Post-Lab Questions will be returned to you as a single packet at the time of your exam. Lab reports are returned to you at the time of the Lecture Exam. Be aware, if I do not have a lab report from you before I return these experiments at the Lecture Exam, that grade automatically will becomes a zero. I will not accept a lab once I have returned graded labs to the class as a whole.

Evaluation


Breakdown

You are expected to use the computer to access eCampus and Mastering Chemistry for this course. All students at Blinn College have Internet access. Computers are available in the Learning Center and in the Open Computer Labs. If you have an e-mail address, it should be on MyBlinn.  I expect you to check eCampus and your e-mail for updates on changes in the class. The syllabus, lecture notes, and homework assignments are available on the course eCampus. You are responsible for all class material and any announcements that appear here. You are expected to visit eCampus the notes and homework assignments on a daily basis. If you are unfamiliar with eCampus, you may access it at https://ecampus.blinn.edu. You logon to eCampus the same way you log onto MyBlinn. You will be able to check on your current standing in the course and your points to date by accessing this course (your section) on eCampus. I need to know immediately if you have difficulty accessing either eCampus or Mastering Chemistry.

Bonus Points/Extra Credit.
There is the possibility of earning extra credit.  Getting full credit on all homework (up to 15 extra points); performing 12 experiments in lab and turning in those lab reports (up to 50 extra points); and possible bonus questions on each of the 5 exams can earn extra credit.  Extra credit is earned not given.  There is no make-up for extra credit.

Final Course Grade

Grading and Grading Policy. CHEM 1412 (4 hr credit) is divided into both lecture (3 hr) and laboratory (1 hr) components. For convenience, the course grade is based upon a 1000 point scale. The lecture will count toward 75% of the final grade (750 pts) and the lab will make up 25% of the final course grade (250 pts). Your grades will be posted on eCampus so you will always know your standing in the course.

Exams (5)

500 pts

50%

Homework

50 pts

5%

Laboratory Experiments and Safety Quiz

250 pts

25%

Final Exam

200 pts

20%

Bonus/Extra Credit

 

 

TOTAL

1000 pts

100%

The course grade will be based upon five (5) exams (500 pts total), laboratory reports (250 pts), homework (50 pts), and a comprehensive final exam (200 pts). The exams and final are cumulative. I do not curve, 900 pts (90.0%) is a guaranteed A; 800 pts (80.0%) is a B; etc.

Blinn College Policies


Blinn College policies on civility, class attendance; scholastic integrity; students with disabilities; final grade appeals; and electronic devices as stated in the Blinn College Student Handbook, Faculty Handbook, Blinn College Catalog and specific technical program handbooks. All policies, guidelines and procedures in the Student and Faculty Handbook and the Board and Administrative Policy Manuals are applicable to this course

Civility Statement

Members of the Blinn College community, which includes faculty, staff and students, are expected to act honestly and responsibly in all aspects of campus life. Blinn College holds all members accountable for their actions and words. Therefore, all members should commit themselves to behave in a manner that recognizes personal respect and demonstrates concern for the personal dignity, rights, and freedoms of every member of the College community, including respect for College property and the physical and intellectual property of others.

      Civility Notification Statement. If a student is asked to leave the classroom because of uncivil behavior, the student may not return to that class until he or she arranges a conference with the instructor; it is the student’s responsibility to arrange for this conference. 

      This statement reflects step one in a possible four step process.  The Incivility Protocol is detailed in the Blinn College Student Handbook, www.blinn.edu/student%20handbook.pdf.

Attendance Policy

The College District believes that class attendance is essential for student success; therefore, students are required to promptly and regularly attend all their classes. A record of attendance will be maintained from the first day of classes and/or the first day the student’s name appears on the roster through final examinations. If a student has one week’s worth of unexcused absences during the semester, he or she will be sent an e-mail by the College District requiring the student to contact his or her instructor and schedule a conference immediately to discuss his/her attendance issues. Should the student accumulate two weeks’ worth of unexcused absences, he or she will be administratively withdrawn from class.

There are four forms of excused absences recognized by the institution:

  1. observance of religious holy days—The student should notify his or her instructor(s) not later than the 15th day of the semester concerning the specific date(s) that the student will be absent for any religious holy day(s);
  2. representing the College District at an official institutional function;
  3. high school dual credit students representing the independent school district at an official institutional function; and
  4. military service.

Other absences may be considered excused at the discretion of the faculty

member with appropriate documentation.  A student enrolled in a developmental course is subject to College District-mandated attendance policies. Failure to attend developmental classes shall result in removal from the course as defined by the College District.

It is the student’s responsibility to officially drop a class he or she is no longer attending.  To officially drop a class the student must obtain the class withdrawal form from Enrollment Services, complete the class withdrawal form, secure the required signatures, and return the completed form to Enrollment Services. The last day to drop with a Q is according to the Academic Calendar.

Scholastic Integrity

Blinn College does not tolerate cheating, plagiarism, or any other act of dishonesty with regard to the course in which you are enrolled.  The following text defines the faculty member’s responsibility with regard to the scholastic integrity expectation for this and all courses at Blinn College.

It is the responsibility of faculty members to maintain scholastic integrity at the College District by refusing to tolerate any form of scholastic dishonesty.  Adequate control of test materials, strict supervision during testing, and other preventive measures should be utilized, as necessary, to prevent cheating or plagiarism.  If there is compelling evidence that a student is involved in cheating or plagiarism, the instructor should assume responsibility and address the infraction.  Likewise, any student accused of scholastic dishonesty is entitled to due process as outlined in Blinn College Board Policy FLB (Local).  The Scholastic Integrity Policy is located in the Blinn College Student Handbook, www.blinn.edu/student%20handbook.pdf.  In a case of scholastic dishonesty, it is critical that written documentation be maintained at each level throughout the process.

Students with Disabilities

Blinn College is dedicated to providing the least restrictive learning environment for all students. Support services for students with documented disabilities are provided on an individual basis, upon request. Requests for services should be made directly to the Office of Special Populations serving the campus of your choice.  For the Bryan campus, the Office of Special Populations (Administration Building) can be reached at (979)209-7251.  The Brenham, Sealy and Schulenburg campuses are served by the Office of Special Populations on the Brenham campus (Administration Building Room 104) and can be reached at (979)830-4157.  Additional information can be found at www.blinn.edu/disability/index.html.

Final Grade Appeal

If a student wishes to appeal a final grade in a course, Blinn College Board Policy FLDB (Local), Course Grade Complaints, outlines the timeline for the appeal and the four steps in the appeal.  This policy is located in the Blinn College Student Handbook, www.blinn.edu/student%20handbook.pdf.

Electronic Devices

All the functions of all personal electronic devices designed for communication and/or entertainment (cell phones, pagers, beepers, iPods, and similar devices) must be turned off and kept out of sight in all College District classrooms and associated laboratories.  Any noncompliance with this policy shall be addressed in accordance with the College District civility policy (administrative policy).  This information is contained in Blinn College Board Policy FLB (Local).

Course Policies


Make-up Policy

There is no make-up provided for missed labs or for late homework.  Missed labs or homework reduces your chance at bonus points.  There is no make-up for bonus points.

Make-up exams. If you miss an exam, you may request a make-up exam. This does not mean that your request will be approved. To request a make-up for a missed exam you must follow this procedure:

  • Notify me by e-mail (bclement@blinn.edu) or by eCampus that you have missed the exam.This way there will be an electronic copy of your notification. (A scheduled doctor's appointment is NOT considered an excused absence.)
  • You must notify me of your absence and provide this documentation within 2 days of your returning to class.
  • IF your excuse is deemed to be valid and you have sufficient documentation, I will fill out the required form (your name, exam number, and instructions) and place a make-up exam for you at the Learning Center (room L258 in the Library Building). I will then e-mail you a reply that it is there and ready for you to take. This also generates an electronic copy of your notification.
  • You will have 1 week in which to take this make-up exam after it is placed in the Learning Center.  Failure to read your e-mail is not an excuse for not taking the make-up exam during this window.
  • Important!! The test will be removed from the learning center seven (7) days after it is placed there for you. If you have not taken the make-up by this time, a grade of zero will be awarded for that exam.  There is no second chance to make-up the exam.

Make-up exams will only be in closed book free response format where you may be required to balance a chemical reaction or perform calculations. These questions may have multiple parts. Questions on these make-up exams involving calculations will require that you show your work. Because you will have had more time to study, these exams will be slightly more difficult than the exams given in the classroom. Unlike the 2-part exams given in class, the make-up exam is a single exam worth 100 points (equal the sum of part A & B).  No extra credit will be given on a make-up exam.

Problem Resolution

 

If you have a complaint about your class, you should first request a conference with your instructor to try and resolve the problems or issues. If the problems or issues cannot be resolved at the instructor level, you should request a conference with the Chemistry Coordinator, Mr. Thomas Jose, Health 252, thomas.jose@blinn.edu, 979-209-7484. If the complaint still is not resolved, you should request a conference with the Assistant Division Chair for Chemistry and Biology, Dr. Lee Don Bienski, Science 231, lbienski@blinn.edu, 979-209-7263. If this still does not resolve the complaint, you should then request a conference with Science Division Chair, Mr. Dwight Bohlmeyer, Science 241, dbohlmeyer@blinn.edu, 979-209-7506. Failure to follow the chain of command will result in a delay in the resolution of your problem.

Classroom and Laboratory Conduct

Classroom and Laboratory Conduct

When you enter the classroom or laboratory, you are entering a learning environment. As such, disruptions due to inappropriate behavior will not be tolerated. Talking, reading the newspaper, texting, and other activities that disrupt or detract from the classroom or laboratory learning experience will not be allowed. Eating and drinking are not allowed in Blinn classrooms. As previously mentioned, any visible food or drink container (even if it is sealed) is a safety violation in lab and will cause your immediate removal from the laboratory with a grade of zero being assigned for that experiment.

SAFETY IN THE LABORATORY

You must have enclosed chemical resistant safety goggles or impact resistant safety glasses for the lab.  You must also dress defensively.  It is recommended that you pack and carry an emergency “go bag” ready for lab which contains your goggles, appropriate clothing (sweats or scrubs) if needed, and appropriate closed-toe footwear so that should you forget, you will have clothes, shoes, and goggles that may be used that day for lab.  Failure to have safety goggles, dress defensively, or wearing flip-flops or sandals will cause you to be removed from the lab for a safety violation.  Failure to use your goggles while in the lab will also cause you to be removed from the lab. You are expected to put on goggles (protecting your eyes) the moment you enter the lab and not to remove them until you leave the laboratory. I am well aware that they are cumbersome, hot, and tend to fog up. These are for your protection and you do not have the option to decline to use them. You will receive one warning to put your goggles on. This first warning will be made the moment chemicals are brought into the room for you to use. The second warning given that day will result in your immediate removal from the laboratory and the assignment of a grade of zero (0) for that entire laboratory experiment (prelab, report, and postlab). Sliding the glasses/goggles up to protect your forehead or hairline is the most common method of getting dismissed from the lab. This will be rigidly enforced. A grade of zero received for a safety violation WILL NOT BE DISMISSED.

IMPORTANT!! If you forget your goggles you will not be allowed to perform the experiment. Your options are to

  1. Borrow a pair from a friend who may be on campus at that time.
  2. Buy another pair from the bookstore.
  3. Miss the lab (unexcused absence) and lose the points associated with that experiment.

You must wear enclosed footwear to the laboratory if a 'wet lab' is being performed. Enclosed footwear may be canvas, leather, steel toed work boots, or even plastic bags securely taped around your feet. If you come to the laboratory and chemicals are being used (other than ink, pencil, paper, and dry erase chemicals for a dry lab), you will be dismissed from the laboratory and receive a grade of zero (0) for that experiment (PreLab, Data, Report, and PostLab Questions, 25 pts lost). There are NO MAKE-UP LABS, if you miss the experiment you automatically lose all points associated with that experiment. If we are continuing in lecture or review, you do not need to have your safety glasses/goggles, you will not need enclosed footwear for dry labs.

NO water bottles, soft drinks, or food is allowed in the laboratory.  This is a safety violation that will result in your removal from the lab.

You should dress defensively for the laboratory. You are required to be covered from your neck to below your knees when performing an experiment in the chemistry laboratory.  You are almost guaranteed that you will ruin at least one piece of clothing in the laboratory. If you wish, you may purchase an apron or an artist's smock (lab coat) to protect your clothes. You may also wish to bring and wear rubber, latex, or nitrile gloves in lab. Gloves may help in preventing skin irritation, on the down side, gloves also tend to increase the unknowing transport of chemicals to your clothing and increase the occurrence of holes in your clothes.

Reading assignments

You can expect to cover at least 1 chapter per week and should use this as a guideline to plan ahead. You should have read all of the topics to be covered in each lecture before coming to class. This material is considered to be fair game for the scheduled exams and the final.

Course eCampus

A CHEM 1412 eCampus homepage has been created and can be found at the following Internet address https://ecampus.blinn.edu. This site contains the course information sheet, homework assignments, and any additional lecture notes for the chapter being covered. Note: Simply studying the notes or old PowerPoint lectures provided on eCampus will not be sufficient to ensure a good grade in this course.

Schedule


WhenTopicNotes
Lecture and Exams
 

Lecture Schedule

 

Date

Day

Room

Subject

Jan. 14

Mon

S113

Introduction, Thermodynamic review Ch 8

Jan. 14

Mon

S228

Lab Orientation, Safety Video review Ch 8

Jan. 16

Wed

S113

Ch 16 Entropy and reactions, Second Law of Thermodynamics

Jan. 16

Wed

S228

Ch 16 Standard Molar entropies and Entropies of Reactions, Gibbs Free energy, Energy Changes in reactions,

Jan. 23

Wed

S113

Ch 16 Free energy and Equilibrium Ch 11 Energy Changes in Solutions, Colligative Properties

Jan. 28

Mon

S113

Ch 11 Rault’s Law, Boiling Pt Elevation, Freezing Pt Depression

Jan. 28

Mon

S228

Ch 11 Osmosis, Osmotic Pressure, Uses of Colligative Properties

Jan. 30

Wed

S113

Exam I Part A

Jan. 30

Wed

S228

Exam I Part B

Feb. 4

Mon

S113

Ch 12 Reaction Rates, Rate Laws, Reaction Order

Feb. 6

Wed

S113

Ch 12 Rate Laws, Zero, First, and Second Order Reactions

Feb. 11

Mon

S113

Ch 12 Reaction Rates, Arrhenius Equation

Feb. 13

Wed

S113

Ch 13 Equilibrium, Kc, Kp, Heterogeneous Equilibrium

Feb. 18

Mon

S113

Ch 13 Equilibrium Constants, Equilibrium Concentrations, Le Chatelier’s Principle, Altering Equilibrium

Feb. 18

Mon

S228

Ch 13 Comparison of Chemical Equilibrium and Chemical Kinetics

Feb. 20

Wed

S113

Exam II Part A

Feb. 20

Wed

S228

Exam II Part B

Feb. 25

Mon

S113

Ch 14 Aqueous Equilibria, Acids and Bases

Feb. 27

Wed

S113

Ch 14 Calculating Equilibrium Constants Ka, Kb

Mar. 4

Mon

S113

Ch 14 Lewis Acids and Bases, Ch 15 Buffers

Mar. 4

Mon

S228

Ch 15 Henderson-Hasselbalch Equation

Mar. 6

Wed

S113

Ch 15 pH Titration Curves, Effects of Acid and Base Strength

Mar. 6

Mon

S228

Ch 15 Ksp, Calculations, Factors Affecting Solubility

Mar. 10 – Mar. 17

Spring Break

Mar. 18

Mon

S113

Ch 15 Selective Precipitation

Mar. 20

Wed

S113

Exam III Part A

Mar. 20

Wed

S228

Exam III Part B

Mar. 25

Mon

S113

Ch 17 Electrochemistry, Galvanic Cells and Cell Notation

Mar. 25

Mon

S228

Ch 17 Nernst Equation, Cell Potentials during Reactions

Mar. 27

Wed

S113

Ch 17 Equilibrium Constants

Apr. 1

Mon

S113

Ch 17 Electrolysis and Electrolytic Cells

Apr. 1

Mon

S228

Ch 17 Electrolysis and Electrolytic Cells, Batteries, Fuel Cells

Apr. 3

Wed

S113

Ch 20 Transition Elements and Coordination Chemistry

Apr. 3

Wed

S228

Ch 20 Nomenclature, Isomers, Bonding Complexes

Apr. 8

Mon

S113

Ch 20 Isomers, Enantiomers, Crystal Field Theory

Apr. 10

Wed

S113

Exam IV Part A

Apr. 10

Wed

S228

Exam IV Part B

Apr. 12

Fri

Last day to drop with a Q

Apr. 15

Mon

S113

Ch 22 Nuclear Chemistry Ch 2.7-2.9 Nuclear Stability and Decay

Apr. 15

Mon

S228

Ch 22 Detecting and Measuring Radioactivity

Apr. 17

Wed

S113

Ch 22 Applications of Nuclear Chemistry

Apr. 22

Mon

S113

Ch 23 Organic Chemistry, Organic Molecules and Families

Apr. 24

Wed

S113

Ch 23 Oxygen Containing Organic Chemicals

Apr. 24

Wed

S228

Ch 23 Reactions and Review

Apr. 29

Mon

S113

Exam V Part A

Apr. 29

Mon

S228

Exam V Part B

May 1

Wed

S113

Review

May 1

Wed

S228

Review

May 4

Saturday

 

Final Exam, 1:00 to 3:00 p.m. (Room and Building TBA)

Homework
 

Homework Modules

Deadline

Chapters 16 and 11

8 pm Monday, Jan. 28

Chapters 12 and 13

8 pm Monday, Feb. 18

Chapters 14 and 15

8 pm Monday, Mar. 18

Chapters 17 and 20

8 pm Monday, Apr. 8

Chapters 22, 2.7-2.9, and 23

8 pm Sunday, Apr. 28

Lab Experiments
 

Date

Exp. #

Subject

Due Date

Jan. 23

Exp. 21

Determination of Mol.Wt. by Freezing Point Depression

Feb. 4

Feb. 4

Exp. 23

Iodine Clock Reaction – Detn. of Rate Expression

Feb. 11

Feb. 6

Exp. 24

Iodine Clock Reaction – Detn. of Ea

Feb. 13

Feb. 11

Exp. 25

Spectroscopic Detn. of Equilibrium Constant

Feb. 18

Feb. 13

Exp. 27

Determination of the Ka of an Unknown Acid

Feb. 20

Feb. 25

Exp. 28

Antacid Analysis

Mar. 4

Feb. 27

Exp. 29

Determination of the Ksp of a Slightly Soluble Substance

Mar. 6

Mar. 18

Exp. 30

Determination of Avogadro’s Number and Faraday’s Const.

Mar. 27

Mar. 27

Exp. 31

Preparation of Coordination Complexes and Spect. Series

Apr. 8

Apr. 8

Exp. 32

Nuclear Chemistry

Apr. 17

Apr. 17

Exp. 33

Preparation of Aspirin and Oil of Wintergreen

Apr. 24

Apr. 22

Exp. 35

Azo Dyes and Indigo (Handout on eCampus)

May 1